After a review cycle has ended, you can prompt your managers to fill out a review summary. (Click here to learn more about the post review process.) There are a number of reasons that you may want your managers to do this. Our top four reasons are below:

1. Summary of the in-person meeting had between a manager and direct report

  • Often times, direct reports want to be able to provide feedback and thoughts on their review. The summary box gives the manager an option to bring the review into the meeting, have a discussion with their direct report, and then make notes about what was discussed. This allows these notes to be tied to the review and helps keep the manager and employee on the same page about the discussion of the review.
  • The workflow for this would be: review cycle closes > manager and employee discuss the feedback > manager makes notes in the summary during or after the meeting > manager shares the summary and all the feedback with their direct report

2. Developmental goals between an employee and their manager

  • Due to the review, managers and employees are often discussing what needs to happen in the next quarter/year in order to get an improved rating/review next time. The summary box allows for the manager to write these action items down with the employee as they collaborate on what goals for the employee should be. Again, this allows for those items to be documented inside of Lattice and in that review packet to help keep the employee accountable and aligned with their manager on their performance/development.
  • The workflow for this would be the same as above: review cycle closes > manager and employee discuss the feedback and settle on goals> manager makes notes in the summary during or after the meeting > optional: manager and employee add goals into Lattice > manager shares the summary and all the feedback with their direct report

3. Manager summary of peer and upward feedback

  • Since peer and upward reviews are being submitted throughout the cycle and a manager may not take that feedback into account when writing their review, the summary box gives them an opportunity to read through all that feedback and summarize their perspective of it back to the employee.
  • Here, a company might use a specific template to help guide what they would like the manager to synthesize (stop, start, continue is very common): Based on this feedback, what are 3 things you should stop doing...Based on this feedback, what are 3 things you should continue doing...Based on this feedback, what are 3 things you should stop doing…
  • This workflow would be: review cycle closes > manager reviews feedback > manager writes summary > manager shares packet (which can either be before or after the in-person meeting depending on the internal process)

4. Replacing the email a manager would send to a employee with their review packet after the cycle ends

  • The final remarks can be used as a way for managers to communicate the release of a review packet and essentially replace the email that they would traditionally send. 
  • Ex: Hi [employee name], Here is your review packet for our 2018 Quarterly Review Cycle. As your manager, I have read your self and peer feedback - great job! Overall you did a fantastic job. Some points I wanted to surface...

Things to consider:

  • For quick reviews, we often recommend to leaving the summary out as it creates an extra step and can delay the sharing process
  • For manager/self reviews, it may not make sense to use a summary unless you are using it to record notes from an in person meeting (#1).
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